Rolled Egg recipes recipe – healthy & easy

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Rolled Egg recipes recipe – healthy & easy

recipe image

Ingredients (5)

  • 1 large egg
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons milk or water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons unsalted butter
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

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Nutritional Information

  • Calories123
  • Fat10.6g
  • Saturated fat5.26g
  • Trans fat0.25g
  • Carbs0.49g
  • Fiber0.05g
  • Sugar0.19g
  • Protein6.36g
  • Cholesterol201.47mg
  • Sodium150.9mg

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My grandfather used to drive an hour from Providence to our house in Boston to roll these breakfast beauties every other Sunday morning. He served them with bagels, cream cheese, and lox. You can get creative and roll anything you like into them.

Tips for Eggs

Eggs should keep a consistent and low temperature. This is best achieved by placing their carton in the center of your fridge. The eggs should also remain in their original packaging to avoid the absorption of strong odors.

It is wise to follow the “best by” date to determine overall freshness, but eggs can be tested by simply dropping them into a bowl of water. Older eggs will float while fresh eggs will sink. This is due to the size of their air cells, which gradually increase over time.

Cooked eggs have a refrigerator shelf life of no more than four days, while hard-boiled eggs, peeled or unpeeled, are safe to consume up to one week after they’re prepared.

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The beauty of an egg is its versatility. Eggs can be cooked in a variety of ways. Here are some tips in accomplishing the four most common preparations.

Scrambled: Whip your eggs in a bowl. The consistency of your scrambled eggs is a personal preference, though it seems like the majority of breakfast connoisseurs enjoy a more runny and fluffy option. In this case, add about ¼ cup of milk for every four eggs. This will help to thin the mix. Feel free to also season with salt and pepper (or stir in cream cheese for added decadence). Grease a skillet with butter over medium heat and pour in the egg mixture. As the eggs begin to cook, begin to pull and fold the eggs with a spatula until it forms curds. Do not stir constantly. Once the egg is cooked to your liking, remove from heat and serve.

Hard-boiled: Fill a pot that covers your eggs by about two inches. Remove the eggs and bring the water to a boil. Once the water begins to boil, carefully drop in the eggs and leave them for 10-12 minutes. For easy peeling, give the eggs an immediate ice bath after the cooking time is completed. For soft-boiled eggs, follow the same process, but cut the cooking time in half.

Poached: Add a dash of vinegar to a pan filled with steadily simmering water. Crack eggs individually into a dish or small cup. With a spatula, create a gentle whirlpool in the pan. Slowly add the egg, whites first, into the water and allow to cook for three minutes. Remove the egg with a slotted spoon and immediately transfer to kitchen paper to drain the water.

Sunny Side Up/Over Easy/Medium/Hard: For each of these preparations, you are cracking an egg directly into a greased frying pan. For sunny side up, no flipping is involved. Simply allow the edges to fry until they’re golden brown. To achieve an over easy egg, flip a sunny side up egg and cook until a thin film appears over the yolk. The yolk should still be runny upon serving. An over medium egg is flipped, fried, and cooked longer until the yolk is still slightly runny. An over hard is cooked until the yolk is hard.

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Eggs can easily be frozen, but instructions vary based on the egg’s physical state. As a general rule, uncooked eggs in their shells should not be frozen. They must be cracked first and have their contents frozen.

Uncooked whole eggs: The eggs must be removed from their shells, blended, and poured into containers that can seal tightly.

Uncooked egg whites: The same process as whole eggs, but you can freeze whites in ice cube trays before transferring them to an airtight container. This speeds up the thawing process and can help with measuring.

Uncooked yolks: Egg yolks alone can turn extremely gelatinous if frozen. For use in savory dishes, add ⅛ teaspoon of salt per four egg yolks. Substitute the salt for sugar for use in sweet dishes and/or desserts.

Cooked eggs: Scrambled eggs are fine to freeze, but it is advised to not freeze cooked egg whites. They become too watery and rubbery if not mixed with the yolk.

Hard-boiled eggs: As mentioned above, it is best to not freeze hard-boiled eggs because cooked whites become watery and rubbery when frozen.

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Instructions

  1. 1Heat an 8- to 9-inch crêpe pan or nonstick frying pan over medium heat until hot, about 3 to 4 minutes.
  2. 2Meanwhile, place the egg and milk or water in a small bowl and beat with a fork until pale yellow and mixed thoroughly.
  3. 3Melt the butter in the pan and, using a rubber spatula, spread it around to evenly coat the pan. When the butter foams, pour in the egg mixture and tilt the pan so it spreads to the edges and makes a perfect circle. Let sit undisturbed until the egg just starts to set around the edges, about 30 to 60 seconds.
  4. 4Using the rubber spatula and a fork, start at one side and roll the egg over itself, an inch at a time, until completely rolled up. For soft, runny eggs, remove from the pan immediately. For more well-done eggs, lightly brown the bottom side, then flip and lightly brown the other side. Season as needed with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

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